Mary Arden’s Family Farm

May 26, 2012 in England, Travel by Kelly

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Next up is a peek around Mary Arden’s farm. Mary Arden was William Shakespeare’s mother. Mary Arden married John Shakespeare in 1557. She was the youngest daughter of eight girls in her family and inherited much of her father’s land and farming estate.  Mary Arden’s parents were John and Mary (Webb) Arden. The Webb family was knit very closely to the Arden family (which I will fully explain in another post someday), which is why my Beloved made it a point to visit this area.

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I love the gardens leading up to the home. They are so quaint, and so peaceful.

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This farm was very much a working farm. Here are a series of shots from behind the house.

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As peaceful and serene as everything looks now, times were not easy and so much work had to be done to sustain a home.

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Standing behind the house, all the buildings make a square behind the house. A pig stye, chicken coop and numerous farm buildings go all around the square.

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Little bitty doorways were a challenge for my Beloved. He’s a giant compared to the people of that time!

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If someone was sick, the first line of defense was the lady of the house.

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At that time, doctors were considered butchers and they were so expensive only the very wealthy could afford them. The lady of the house was very knowledgeable in herbs and made homemade medicines, potions and teas to treat anyone who was ill.

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The Medicine Room (this entire room) was dedicated to drying and preserving the herbs to treat her family. Every family had their own “receipts” or remedies that were unique to their family. People didn’t help one another then, so healthcare was completely up to the lady of the house.

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These are some of the implements that would have been common to find in her home as well.

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The brick oven where the daily bread was baked…

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and an outhouse. This sight makes me thankful I live in the day of modern conveniences!

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The water well.

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The farm would also have had a room for leather making, drying out skins and tanning the leather in the sun.

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This was a game/hunting room.

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And that ends our look at Mary Arden’s farm. Coming up next is a look around Warwick Castle!